Intel's Ronler Acres Plant

Silicon Forest

Monday, August 24, 2015

Jerry

Red Volve P1800. Not Jerry's.
Iaman tells me that Jerry Seinfeld is going for coffee in a Red Volvo P1800. You can watch the video if you want, too much talking and not enough action for me. Uniberp, a Volvo enthusiast of the first water, had a P1800 a while back. It was famous in our crowd because, well, I dunno, perhaps because it was the only P1800 any of us had ever seen in the flesh. Anyway, he's got an old Volvo Amazon, sorry 122, now and because it's old, he gets to spend time working on it:
The P1800, lol. Slow, bulgy and soft, pretending to be vigorous, sleek and sexy. The fallback sportscar for upper-middle-aged regretophiles to add to their steel barn collections. There are some legitimate nuts (v-performance.com), however. I actually feel sorry for someone who pays $10k for a P1800 expecting to drive it comfortably.
I'm making progress on the 122s wagon, which may be approaching viability. As originally equipped with a generator and points ignition, it is currently only suitable for test rides to the Ace hardware store, which for a car of this vintage, has more parts and materials usable than the actual auto parts stores.
The last time I had one it was in 1980, and it was a 12 year old car then. This one is a 48 year old car, which has sat outside most of it's life. The fact that it is still on it's feet is a testament to the steel and rubber used, but it smells old. Good thing it has vent wings.
As is it can sell for 2000-3000, which puts me about even, and I've lost 12 pounds since I acquired it, so that puts me well ahead in other, more ineffable ways. "Even" is miles ahead of where most restoration projects land, although I am carefully balancing the value of any "restorative" work. I am currently taking the "conserve" approach, for instance, just polishing out the old paint, despite the numerous dings and chips. It came with a pair of original steel fenders, which I had artistically welded (ripoff, but done), and it turns out the best match for paint is 60%Rustoleum Gloss Forest Green+40%Rustoleum Satin Black, which is much better than the bluer and brighter scientifically metered calibrated PPG custom mix. So I have to respray the fenders, which I will do with casual disdain and a sandwich in one hand, to make sure it isn't too sparkly perfect.
The chrome on the bumpers is shot. The stainless and aluminum trim can all be polished and de-dinged. The upholstery I restitched, which I like to do, with my sailmakers sewing machine. It makes me feel I have a comprehensive skill set when I can weld and swew in the same day.
It required some floorboard welding for which I purchased a Harbor Freight $109 flux-core 110VAC welder, and I have used it quite a bit. to good effect. Following internet advice, I bought domestic (Lincoln) wire, and expected a learning curve. The trouble it, when you go to the trouble of welding, you want something to show for the effort, and you may as well try it on a live project, especially one that is kinda old and junky to begin with. Turns out that flux core welds nicely right through rust. I tacked the old exhaust back together surprisingly tidily, although that will be one of the first things purchased (custom from local "Muffler Man") when it is licensed.